TRU Blog

TRU Blog Archive for April, 2015

WWII 70: Marching to Victory | April 28, 2015

WWII highlights from the Truman Library’s archives and collections

Marching to Victory: The Liberation of Dachau
April 29, 1945

In April 1945, as the European war neared its end, one question loomed large: how would the Allies ensure that justice was served to the perpetrators of Dachau and other Nazi crimes against humanity?

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WWII 70: Marching to Victory

WWII 70: Marching to Victory | April 12, 2015

WWII highlights from the Truman Library’s archives and collections

Marching to Victory: “The President Is Dead”
April 12, 1945

On the afternoon of April 12, 1945, Vice President Harry S. Truman was just starting to relax after a day of presiding over the Senate when he was urgently summoned to the White House. There he received the unwelcome news that President Franklin Roosevelt had died and that he, Truman, was now president.

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WWII 70: Marching to Victory

WWII 70: Marching to Victory | April 10, 2015

 

WWII highlights from the Truman Library’s archives and collections

 

Marching to Victory: The Liberation of Buchenwald
April 11, 1945

On April 11, GIs of the 6th Armored Division entered Buchenwald, the main camp in a large complex of concentration camps near Weimar that had recently been abandoned by German troops. American soldiers who liberated the camp were met by thousands of emaciated camp survivors. Shortly after the camp’s liberation, Bernard Bernstein reached Buchenwald and came face-to-face with the horrors of the Nazi Holocaust. His story is part of the Truman Library’s archives, and it begins here…

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WWII 70: Marching to Victory

WWII 70: Marching to Victory | April 1, 2015

WWII highlights from the Truman Library’s archives and collections

Marching to Victory: The Battle of Okinawa

April 1, 1945 – Easter Sunday, April Fools’ Day, and codenamed “Love Day” by U.S. forces – must have seemed an unwarlike day for starting a major military operation. Yet it was on that date that American troops landed on the Pacific island of Okinawa, initiating one of the bloodiest and most important battles of World War II.

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WWII 70: Marching to Victory