TRU Blog

TRU Blog

WWII 70: Marching to Victory | September 4, 2015

 

WWII highlights from the Truman Library’s archives and collections

 

Marching to Victory: Prisoners of War
September 4, 1945

To Private Luther D. Bass and the hundreds of other Allied survivors of Tokyo POW Camp #8B, time must have seemed like it slowed to a crawl in early September 1945. Bass and many of his fellow prisoners of war had been captives of the Japanese for over three years, suffering hunger and forced labor. Now the war was over and they had been evacuated to the town of Onahoma to await liberation. Yet it would take several days for American forces to reach Onahoma. How had Bass survived his captivity, and how would he and his fellow POWs endure their anxious wait for liberation?
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WWII 70: Marching to Victory

WWII 70: Marching to Victory | September 2, 2015

 

WWII highlights from the Truman Library’s archives and collections

 

Marching to Victory: The Formal Surrender of Japan
September 2, 1945

It is Sunday, September 2. Some 280 Allied warships and thousands of troops are staged in Tokyo Bay. On the deck of one vessel, the battleship USS Missouri, General Douglas MacArthur and 50 other Allied leaders are assembled. It is not a battle they have prepared for, however, but a brief ceremony. The men aboard the Missouri are about to witness Japan’s formal surrender.
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WWII 70: Marching to Victory

Picturing History – Japan Surrenders | August 14, 2015

 

VICTORY!

“I have received this afternoon a message from the Japanese Government…”

At 7 pm on August 14, 1945, President Harry Truman stood before reporters gathered at the White House and announced the unconditional surrender of Japan. The Pacific War was over. Although the formal signing of the terms of surrender ending World War II would not occur until September 2nd, the announcement of Victory over Japan Day, or V-J Day, sent millions of Americans–citizens and member sof the armed forces, out into the streets of cities and towns across the country and around the world.

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Picturing History – Japan Surrenders

WWII 70: Marching to Victory | August 14, 2015

 

WWII highlights from the Truman Library’s archives and collections

 

Marching to Victory: Japan Surrenders
August 14, 1945

As Emperor Hirohito and his cabinet accepted the surrender terms on August 14, officials on both sides knew Japanese commanders and soldiers would find it a bitter pill to swallow. How could Japan’s proud troops be convinced to lay down their arms and finally end the bloodshed of World War II?

Davidson Sommers’ oral history in the collections of the Harry S. Truman Library and Museum reveals how American and Japanese leaders worked out a last-minute plan to achieve peace.

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WWII 70: Marching to Victory

WWII 70: Marching to Victory | August 7, 2015

 

WWII highlights from the Truman Library’s archives and collections

 

Marching to Victory: The Bombing of Nagasaki
August 9, 1945

Visitors to the Harry S. Truman Library and Museum can view a unique artifact that speaks to the revolutionary power and danger of the weapon that destroyed Nagasaki and helped end World War II.
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WWII 70: Marching to Victory

WWII 70: Marching to Victory | August 4, 2015

 

WWII highlights from the Truman Library’s archives and collections

 

Marching to Victory: The Bombing of Hiroshima
August 6, 1945

At 8:15 AM on August 6, 1945, an American B-29 bomber opened its bay doors over the Japanese city of Hiroshima and released a solitary bomb. Forty-four seconds later, it exploded 1,900 feet above the city. This single explosion brought the Second World War into its final phase and revealed to the world a new and devastating weapon.
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WWII 70: Marching to Victory

WWII 70: Marching to Victory | July 27, 2015

 

WWII highlights from the Truman Library’s archives and collections

 

Marching to Victory: The Potsdam Declaration
July 26, 1945

By July 1945, Japan was defeated nearly everywhere except in the hearts and minds of the Japanese. Even as the Japanese Empire crumbled and the suffering Japanese prepared for invasion, military leaders reminded their people that national honor prohibited surrender to the Allies.
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WWII 70: Marching to Victory